Why can’t the cleverest country in Europe get any Nobel Prizes? Raj Persaud and Professor Adrian Furnham

· Uncategorized

Why can’t the cleverest country in Europe get any Nobel Prizes?

 

Raj Persaud and Professor Adrian Furnham

 

DSCN0555This year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week; over the years certain countries tend to dominate the Nobel Laureate committee’s assessment of outstanding academic contributions.

Obviously a larger national population should be associated with more chances of getting a Nobel prize, so the ‘top of the charts’ list of which countries do best in winning prizes needs to take into account population size.

As a result, some extremely small countries do very well, such as the Faroe Islands and St Lucia (which are ranked joint number one). This is because if you are that small a nation, you just have to get one prize, and you immediately leap to the top of this list, which is number of prizes divided by size of population.

It is notable that Europe does rather well, even taking into account population size. At third on the international league table of most Nobel prizes per head of population is Switzerland, followed by Austria, Denmark, Sweden.

The UK is ranked number 7 in the world in terms of countries winning the prize per head of population.

Then comes Norway, Netherlands, Germany, then Israel, followed then by the USA at 12th position worldwide.

This list should in some sense reflect the excellence of the educational system, yet one European country is enigmatically missing from the upper end of this chart.

It does surprisingly badly in winning Nobel Prizes. Yet this country scores highest amongst European countries in various measures of educational attainment, suggesting it has one of the best school systems in the world.

For example, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA);  a triennial international survey evaluating education systems worldwide consistently places this country above all its European competitors.

Finland has a famously consistent excellent performance in the OECD’s PISA international assessments. These test reading comprehension, science literacy and Math in 15-year-olds in up to 65 countries in Europe, North America, and Asia, drawing upon around 500,000 pupils.

Finland was ranked 1st in 2000, 2003, and 2006, and 3rd in 2009 — beaten by Shanghai and South Korea. In 2012, the reported results were divided up by subtest, and weighting each subtest equally, put Finland in 7th place overall, making it the highest-ranked country outside Northeast Asia.

Many have speculated on reasons for Finland’s high performance. Suggestions include that the country emphasizes equality, and that there is a strong culture of respecting education.

Another popular theory is more genetic – that Finns have evolved differently from the rest of Europe due, perhaps, to a colder environment. A cold and predictable environment, which was the nature of Ice Age Europe would select in favour of intelligence genes, because, so the theory goes, those who could plan for the future, mastering the production of buildings and warm clothes, would be more likely to survive. Higher intelligence would have been selected for, because the environment was more cognitively demanding than a more congenial one.

A new study just published entitled ‘Solving the puzzle of why Finns have the highest IQ, but one of the lowest number of Nobel prizes in Europe’, attempts to explain the Finnish enigma. In so doing the key finding appears to unlock an essential secret of success. This surprising conclusion may have remained obscured before this study, by the widespread idea that doing well in school is the key to intellectual success later in life.

It turns out that if Nobel Prizes are a measure of ultra-mind performance, that in fact conventional educational performance may not be a good guide to the future.

The authors of this new study, Edward Dutton, Jan te Nijenhuis and Eka Roivainen, argue that Finland is the best performing European or European-descent country on PISA school academic testing because it has the highest IQ of any European country. Finns also score higher on character features of ‘Conscientiousness’ and ‘Agreeableness’ compared with other Europeans. These personal qualities predict success in school exams.

However, the authors also argue that these factors might explain Finland’s relative lack of Nobel prizes for science.

In terms of per capita Nobel Prizes worldwide, Finland is at 22nd place, much lower down the table than any of its European neighbours, including all comparable northern European countries.

The problem, according to this study published in the academic journal ‘Intelligence’, is that Finns, despite their very high average IQ, are poorly represented amongst Nobel Prize winners in science, in comparison to other European countries, because the Finnish population has a very low score, on other key personality features. Characteristics which now turn out to be key to the kind of success represented by winning a Nobel Prize – they score low on Psychoticism and Extraversion.

The authors, based at University of Oulu, Finland and the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands contend that Extraversion predicts creativity, as extraverts are more prepared to confront authority and promote themselves.

A high level of psychoticism is inherent to genius because discoveries, and presenting them, are underpinned by making unusual connections, thinking outside of the conventional rules, and offending vested interests. A person who was too high in Conscientiousness would be too rule-following to make new discoveries. Someone too high in Agreeableness might not present or pursue the ideas, for risk of causing offence.

The argument that Finns, with their high average intelligence, do relatively poorly in terms of Nobel Prizes due to low Psychoticism and Extraversion, would be strengthened if it were also the case with other countries.

Japan is 30th in the world in terms of per capita Nobel Prizes for science, despite having an average IQ which is much higher than the average European intelligence quotient. A reasonable explanation for their puzzlingly poor performance in Nobel Prizes, would be that Japan is very high in Agreeableness and Conscientiousness and low in Extraversion.

The key secret of success for nations, as well as at the personal level, is how to balance creativity, assertiveness and rebelliousness, with necessary intelligence, conscientiousness and agreeableness.

 

 

RAJ PERSAUD IN CONVERSATION – DOWNLOAD THE FREE APP FOR ANDROID

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rajpersaud.android.rajpersaud&hl=en_GB

5 Comments

Comments RSS
  1. Cyrus

    Does Finland really do that badly in winning Nobel Prizes? This is a complete list of countries by Nobel laureates per capita: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Nobel_laureates_per_capita

    Finland is at number 21 above countries like New Zealand, Canada, Australia, Italy and Poland. It’s just three ranks below Belgium and four ranks below the EU average. An important historical fact you also need to remember is that **Finland only started industrialising fairly recently and was still an agrarian society until the 1950s**. That is going to influence their Nobel laureates per capita in comparison to countries like Austria, Germany and the UK that started industrialising a lot earlier.

    Japan is at number 41, so significantly below Finland and other industralised nations in their Nobel laureates per capita. Japan is also just 7 ranks above the world average in its Nobel laureates per capita, which is quite a poor performance considering how long they’ve been rich imo.

    • rajendra0

      Many thanks for your comment – the point of our piece is that Finland should be doing better considering how ‘high IQ’ the population is – please see this paragraph in our piece – ‘Finland has a famously consistent excellent performance in the OECD’s PISA international assessments. These test reading comprehension, science literacy and Math in 15-year-olds in up to 65 countries in Europe, North America, and Asia, drawing upon around 500,000 pupils.

      Finland was ranked 1st in 2000, 2003, and 2006, and 3rd in 2009 — beaten by Shanghai and South Korea. In 2012, the reported results were divided up by subtest, and weighting each subtest equally, put Finland in 7th place overall, making it the highest-ranked country outside Northeast Asia’.

      The title of the study we quote is: ‘Solving the puzzle of why Finns have the highest IQ, but one of the lowest number of Nobel prizes in Europe’. The issue isn’t therefore just where Finland is in the Nobel Prize table – it’s where you would expect it to be considering how high IQ the population is – which is that it should be much higher – because it’s population has a higher IQ than countries which are above it on the Nobel Prize league table. Obviously there are other issues other than just IQ involved in winning Nobel Prizes, but I fear that your brief comment may have missed the point of our piece. You only mention where Finland is in the league table for Nobel Prizes but don’t discuss the key point that is being raised – where it should be considering the IQ question.

      Best wishes
      Raj Persaud

  2. itsnobody

    IQ tests can’t measure all levels of cognition, it only measures one type of intelligence.

    Usually making big Nobel prize worthy contributions requires you to invent new ideas and think outside of what’s already known, something that IQ tests don’t measure.

    In the future it will probably be very easy to make a robot that has an IQ above 200, but would we be able to make a robot that can come up with Nobel prize worthy contributions?

    I’ve always wondered why so many super-high IQ people can’t contribute anything, I guess it’s because they only have the IQ-type intelligence and lack other cognitive abilities.

    My hypothesis is that IQ is actually “Learning Speed Quota”….meaning high IQ people can learn quickly but they wouldn’t necessarily be able to contribute anything.

    In order to contribute something you have to make new observations, have new ideas, etc…things not measured by IQ tests.

  3. George

    South Korea has one of the highest if not the highest IQ in the world… and 0 science noble prizes (1 peace prize). It also scores quite high on neuroticism. Mongolia also has one of the highest IQs in the world. So high-IQ low-Nobel-prizes isn’t a rare outlier. Japan too.

    According to the first paper that comes up from searching for personality traits by country, Finland has higher extroversion than the Netherlands, France and the UK. And if you’ve been to Finland this seems correct.

    And the Scandinavian countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland) are infamously introverted but have nearly the highest rates of Nobel prizes.

    The real driving force behind this study and its conclusions is West Germanic cultural prejudices and interpreting the world to suit them. If you are not aware, the West Germanic tribes/cultures are quit hostile to both introversion and ‘not fighting everything’. Combined that with false cultural preconceptions about Finland that aren’t even accurate and you get this study.

    As the other commenter says, the most likely explanation is that Finland developed later and has had less time to develop the kind of deep expertise that wins Nobel prizes. South Korea and Mongolia having 0 prizes fits this explanation, and Japan’s low count fits with Japan being developed for half as long as Western Europe. I thought (stereotypically agrarian) Norway might be an outlier in this model, but even it developed 60 years before Japan did.

  4. Bob Smith

    That would explain why the Jews win so many Nobel prizes. Throughout history they have made their neighbors dislike them. Which is a trait of psychoticism.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: